F.A.Q

What is the number for customer service

1-800-237-0387

What are the airline carry on sizes?

Airline Number Allowed Size Limits
Alaska 2 9 x 14 x 22
American 2 45 linear inches
America West 2 54 linear inches for Garment Gags, 45 other
Continental 2 45 linear inches
Delta 2 22 x 14 x 9
Northwest 1 54 linear inches
Southwest 2 10 x 24 x 16
TWA 2 62 linear inches
United 2 22 x 14 x 9
US Airways 2 22 x 16 x 16 overhead
21 x 16 x 8 under seat
45 x 23.5 x 4 garment bag

What are the different types of travelware?

Uprights/Rolling Suitcases
Newer-styled suitcases, which are configured to stand vertically. They are much easier to pull through an airport, because of their retractable handles and wheels Sizes vary from18″ to 30″ tall. Rolling uprights are available in a wide range of materials. Many are expandable and a variety of addtional features may be available, such as pockets, pouches, etc.

Carry-ons
Carry-ons are small suitcases, sometimes called “underseaters” because they are designed to fit underneath the seat on a plane. Carry-ons vary in size, but generally do not exceed 22″ and are designed for short trips. Many feature inside and outside pockets, more than one packing compartment, and shoulder straps or handles.

Totes and Casual Bags
Totes are casual, all-purpose bags which are smaller than carry-ons and come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. Some totes are designed for travel and match a full line of luggage. The simplest totes look like open-top shopping bags made of fabric or leather. Other totes might feature zippered, waterproof pockets, expandable bottoms, and shoulder straps.

Garment Bags and Garment Carriers
The basic idea of a garment bag is to permit travelers to pack their clothes on hangers. Garment bags are designed to hold two to four garments. Garment carriers are portable “closets” on hangers. Garment bags range in length from 40″ for men’s suits to 54″ for women’s dresses, and many can expand to 60″ for evening clothes.

Toiletry/Utility Kits
Available in a variety of sizes ranging from small cases for handbags to large traveling cases; they are made of leather, vinyl, or fabric with coated, water-repellant linings, and have zipper or snap closures. These kits are mostly used to carry toiletry and or cosmetic items

What are the different types of business cases and accessories?

Business cases can be the ultimate organizational feature behind a successful businessperson. Some business cases are computer-compatible, others are ergonomically correct. Whatever the function may be, today’s business cases and computer bags feature both trendy and traditional styles, offering busy executives more pockets, compartments and organizer sections than in the past.

Business cases can range from the classic leather business attachè to the office-to-go on wheels. There are business cases that can conceal computer laptops as well as ones that allow a user to work on a computer while it remains in the case.

Business cases are styled to enhance the working business wardrobe and fitted to cope with the various needs of business people. Most business cases are manufactured with leather, vinyl, or fabric. Some are made of molded plastic, metal, or even wood.

Attachès
The attachè is a fully framed, box-shaped case which is usually secured by one or more combination or key locks. The inside top of the case is frequently fitted with pockets or files (either removable or permanent) to organize papers and other business accessories such as calculators, pens, and business cards. Some attachès include a removable portfolio. Attachès open flat so that the contents can be easily seen and can also be used like a desk.

Envelopes
Envelopes have flap closures with locks or snaps. Some have handles or detachable shoulder straps. Others are carried under the arm. They may be simple one-compartment cases, or larger bags with gussets (pleated sides) and interiors fitted with files. They are typically soft, and open from the top, giving access to contents the way a file drawer does. Envelopes are generally lightweight and have some expandability.

Zippered Cases
Zippered cases open from the top, with either a top zipper, or zippers that extend around two or three sides. They range from simple, unfitted styles to those with more elaborately featured interiors. Some have outside pockets. They may have no handles, retractable or fixed handles, and a detachable shoulder strap. Zippered cases come in many styles and feature expandability.

Catalog Cases or Pilot Cases
A rectangular bag closed by a long single flap or double flaps (one of which fits over the other), the catalog or pilot’s case is designed for maximum carrying capacity. Handles can be double straps or fixed, and fit through a slot in the flaps. These rigid box-type cases have wider tops than brief bags and are not flexible. While the 18″ size is most popular, the 20″ size is ideal for computer printouts and larger paperwork.

How do I care for my luggage?

Polyester
Polyester is a durable and resilient fabric. It has excellent abrasion resistance. For best results, clean the surface with mild soap and water and a soft rag. Do not saturate the fabric. For best results, clean the entire panel, not just the soiled area. After your fabric has been cleaned, spray it with Scotchguard?to restore its water, dirt and stain-resistant properties. Do not use these cleaners on leather trim.

Ballistic Nylon
Ballistic nylon is treated with Teflon?to repel water, dirt and stains, which makes cleaning your luggage easy. Clean with mild soap and water and a nylon-bristled brush. Do not saturate the fabric. For best results, clean the entire panel, not just the soiled area. Foaming upholstery cleaners made for wool-nylon blend fabrics also work well. After your fabric has been cleaned, spray it with Scotchguard?to restore its water, dirt and stain-resistant properties. Do not use these cleaners on leather trim.

Hardware
Avoid oiling locks or hinges, since oil may leak in and stain case linings or clothing. If hardware should become scratched, rub lightly with fine steel wool and re-seal with lacquer or clear nail polish

The cleaning products mentioned are available at leading grocery and chain stores nationwide. As always, when using any commercial cleaning product, follow the manufacturer’s directions carefully

What are the different types of materials?

Abrasion Resistance: The ability to resist wear from the continuous rubbing of the fabric against another surface or tearing. Products made from fibers that possess both high breaking strength and abrasion resistance can be carried longer and more often before signs of wear appear.

Ballistic: A standard, even basket weave of 2+warp over 2+ fill; originally specified by the Federal Government for military use, made of 1050 denier 14oz. filament nylon. Ballistic materials are rugged, tough, strong and can vary widely in definition.

Bursting strength: A fabric’s ability to resist rupture by pressure. For example, the amount of pressure required for puncturing a piece of material with a pencil.

Colorfastness: A fabric’s ability to withstand exposure to sunlight and laundering without fading or running.

Denier: An international weight measurement of a specified length of fiber that indicates fineness or thickness. Denier refers to the fiber of the yarn and not the weave.

Durability: A fabric’s overall ability to withstand extensive wear and exposure to a variety of weather conditions.

Embossing: Surface interest and decoration that is obtained by passing fabric or materials through an engraved roller with applied heat and pressure.

Lining: A material used to cover the inner surface. Smooth, lustrous fabrics are generally used.

Natural Blend: A blended fabric that contains a minimum of 60% cotton.

PVC (polyvinylidene chloride): A chemical compound that can be extruded and applied as backing to a material as a film or coating to provide a strong, water-resistant backing. It can be colored, embossed and/or printed.

Resiliency: The ability of a material to spring back to shape after being creased, twisted or distorted. It is closely connected with wrinkle recovery. An example of good resiliency is polyester.

Tear Strength: The force required to begin or continue to tear a fabric.

Thread Count: Used to define the quality of a fabric in terms of threads or yarns per-square-inch. For example, a 200-count fabric has 200-yarns per square inch, counting the yarns in both directions. The higher the count, the better the quality.

Waterproof: Material that blocks out water completely. To be waterproof, the item must have taped seams and protected zippers.

Water Resistant: A fabric’s ability to resist water and moisture penetration from its surface. This is a less rigorous standard than “waterproof”.

Woven: Fabrics composed of two sets of yarns, warp and filling. This is formed by weaving, which is the interlacing of these sets of yarns.

MATERIALS
LEATHER
Leather is used in luggage construction both as coverings and trim. It comes in different types, with different names and expectations.

1) Genuine Leather–Top grain or full grain leather is the outermost layer of the skin. It is the most desirable material because of its durability, strength and ability to take finish. Plus, the original animal grain markings create a distinctive personal piece.

2) Splits–The under-layers of a hide are known as “splits” because these layers are split off from under the top grain. They usually have a surface treatment simulating the color and grain of top grain.

3) Processed–Processed leather is one type of skin or hide made to look like another type, such as calfskin with alligator markings. Leather scraps that are pulverized and bonded with glue are sometimes called “bonded leather” or “laminated leather.”

FABRICS
Fabrics range from natural fibers such as cotton, duck, linen, canvas, and jute, to manufactured materials,
including nylon and vinyl.

NYLON
Nylon is a strong, light-to-medium weight abrasion-resistant material used for both coverings and linings. The fabric is marked according to thickness of fiber, or denier. The higher the denier, the stronger the fiber.

For durability, nylon luggage should be a minimum of 400 denier, woven in a tight construction. If the denier is less than 400, other materials such as nylon taffeta or heavy-duty vinyl (to add to its strength) should support it. Nylon at 70 denier or higher come in the configuration of 210, 420, etc.

Colorway: A color offered from a line of products that is sold in several different colors.

Cotton: A soft, fluffy, natural fiber that grows on the seeds in the pods of bushy plants and small trees from the Gossypium genus. Cotton fiber’s quality is determined by its whiteness, strength, length and fineness. Generally, longer fibers are finer, stronger and more desirable. Cotton is graded in seven classifications according to its growth maturity, cleanliness, color and freedom from insect damage.

Nylon has great fashion versatility as it can be woven in many patterns, including tweeds and jacquards. Urethane coatings–water and stain repellents–are applied to the nylon fabric surface to sustain the bag’s appearance. Scotchguard? Zepel and Teflon are among the protective coatings used.

Ballistic nylon is a durable and tear-resistant fabric commonly used in better luggage. The term ballistic connotes a sturdy nylon weave that is similar to the fabric used in bulletproof vests. It comes in 1050 denier, 1680 denier, 2520 denier.

Vinyl
Vinyl, a moderately priced plastic material, is used for both coverings and trims. Available in a wide range of colors, the material has strong stain-resistance, and can be wiped clean. Vinyl is sometimes treated to resemble leather–it is important to check the labeling on the product.

Molded Materials
Injection molded cases are made by pouring molten plastic (usually polypropylene) into a cavity to make a hard seamless shell. Vacuum-formed cases take a sheet of plastic (usually ABS, or Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene), heat it, and suck it down into a dye. These cases usually have a vinyl copy sheet which allows for greater variety in surface appearance and are extremely durable.

Canvas
A stiff, cotton fabric, generally of a tight plain weave of two- to 14-ply yarns. Highly subject to mildew, canvas can be chemically treated to curb the effects of weather damage.

Jute
A coarse, natural fiber, sometimes made from the tough, inner bark of Asian members of the basswood family.

Microfibers
An extremely fine, tightly woven fiber produced in a variety of synthetic fibers, such as polyester, nylon and acrylicthan, microfiber combines natural breath ability with wind and water resistance.

Polyester
Man-made fiber produced by the polymerization of the product formed when an alcohol and organic acid and react. Polyester at 600 denier or higher comes in configurations of 1200, 1800, 2400 and etc.

Ramie
A bast (strong coarse) fiber, similar to flax (cellulose fiber from which linen is made), which comes from the stalk of a plant.

Rip-stop
Extra strength fibers interwoven into a fabric at specific intervals to prevent a tear from spreading.

Tapestry
Originally a heavy, hand-woven reversible material used for rugs, wall hangings and upholstery that frequently depicted a scene or story. Non-reversible imitations are now machine made in a variety of weights and styles. Properties vary according to the fibers used. Cotton blends are subject to mildew.

Twill
Any fabric made from the twill weave.

ZIPPERS
Slider Body: the slider joins or separates the elements when the zipper is opened or closed. Various types of sliders are available depending on use.

Pull-Tab: The piece that joins the slider body.

Teeth: the teeth, also known as elements, are the parts on each side of a zipper that mesh, or engage, with each other when passed through the slider. When the left and the right side teeth are engaged they are called chain

Polyester
Polyester is a durable and resilient fabric. It has excellent abrasion resistance. For best results, clean the surface with mild soap and water and a soft rag. Do not saturate the fabric. For best results, clean the entire panel, not just the soiled area. After your fabric has been cleaned, spray it with Scotchguard?to restore its water, dirt and stain-resistant properties. Do not use these cleaners on leather trim.

Ballistic Nylon
Ballistic nylon is treated with Teflon?to repel water, dirt and stains, which makes cleaning your luggage easy. Clean with mild soap and water and a nylon-bristled brush. Do not saturate the fabric. For best results, clean the entire panel, not just the soiled area. Foaming upholstery cleaners made for wool-nylon blend fabrics also work well. After your fabric has been cleaned, spray it with Scotchguard?to restore its water, dirt and stain-resistant properties. Do not use these cleaners on leather trim.

Hardware
Avoid oiling locks or hinges, since oil may leak in and stain case linings or clothing. If hardware should become scratched, rub lightly with fine steel wool and re-seal with lacquer or clear nail polish

The cleaning products mentioned are available at leading grocery and chain stores nationwide. As always, when using any commercial cleaning product, follow the manufacturer’s directions carefully